This week on Eating Matters, host Kim Kessler welcomes in studio Ralph Loglisci of the Food and Environment Reporting Network (FERN) and via phone, Nadia Johnson of Just Food. Kicking off the show with a discussion about the recent People’s Climate March which recently occurred in New York City, Ralph and Nadia share their opinions on why the march and its cause is very connected to concerns about food and food policy. After the break, Kim gets Joan Gussow on the line to add her thoughts. Joan, a well known professor, author, food policy expert, environmentalist and gardener, is someone that The New York Times has called the “matriarch of the eat-locally-think-globally food movement.” Kim talks with Joan about the idea of what is referred to as ‘information pollution’ in the food industry. Seeking the truth behind controversial topics, it is increasingly difficult to find an unbiased information, especially when large corporations are concerned. Joan has led her classes through ways to dissect this type of problem and to be on the watch for who might be sponsoring such information. Taking on other hot topics spawned by the People’s Climate March, Joan initiates great talking points and encourages the consumer to educate themselves about where their food comes from and at what cost. Tune in for a thought-provoking episode picking up where the People’s Climate March left off. This program was brought to you by White Oak Pastures.





“I tell my students that the best thing you can do is to have some kind of cognizant frame where to put each piece of information, otherwise you end up with a heap of stuff.” [26:08]


“If you’re going to talk about climate issues, you can’t really avoid talking the fact that we eat way too much meat – too much protein, period.” [29:18]


“Recognize, as Barbara Kingsolver said long ago, that whatever great thing you do today remember that it began with eating something that came out of soil.” [35:25]


Joan Gussow on Eating Matters